Imupharm Immune Health Onco Nutrition Heart Health Endocrine Health Joint and Bone Health Digestive Support Men's Health Women's Health Detox Support

Advanced Integrative Immunotherapy for Cancer

 

 

 

 



SUGGESTED USE: Use as suggested by your health care professional.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained on this web site has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. Material on the Imupharm web site is provided for educational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition, and before undertaking any diet, exercise or other health program.



Enzymes are organic molecules that increase the rates of chemical reactions. Almost all enzymes are proteins, and almost all biological cell processes need enzymes to occur at significant rates. Enzymes are often very specific as to which reactions they catalyze and the substrates (i.e. molecule on which it acts) involved in the reactions. (Reference 1)

Enzymes

Amylase
Amylase is a class of digestive enzymes found naturally in the body (generally found in saliva), which aids in the breakdown of carbohydrates. (Reference 2) It is mainly produced in the pancreas and secreted by the salivary glands. (Reference 3)

Protease

Protease is any enzyme that can break down protein into its component peptides. (Reference 4) It breaks down proteins found in eggs, cheese, nuts and meats. (Reference 5)

Lipase

Lipase breaks down fats found in most dairy products, nuts, oils, and meat. (Reference 5)

Trypsin

Trypsin is derived from animal pancreas, breaks down proteins. (Reference 5)

Trypsin is one of the three principle digestive enzymes that act to degrade proteins. It is also referred to as a proteolytic enzyme or proteinase. The other two proteinases are pepsin and chymotrypsin. Trypsin is produced in the pancreas of many vertebrates as the inactive proenzyme trypsinogen. This is secreted into the small intestine where it is activated to trypsin. In the digestive process trypsin acts with the other proteinases to break down dietary protein molecules to their component peptides and into their smaller building blocks, namely amino acids, so that they can be absorbed. Trypsin continues the process of digestion (begun in the stomach) in the small intestine where a slightly alkaline environment (about pH 8) promotes its maximal enzymatic activity.

Trypsin and chymotrypsin appear to have similar mechanisms of action. The main difference between the two molecules seems to be in their specificity, that is, each is active only against the peptide bonds in protein molecules that have carboxyl groups donated by certain amino acids. For trypsin these amino acids are arginine and lysine, for chymotrypsin they are tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, methionine, and leucine.

Chymotrypsin

Chymotrypsin is one of the principle proteolytic enzymes acting in the digestive system of mammals and other organisms to break down proteins into their smaller building blocks so that they can be absorbed. It is synthesized in the pancreas by protein biosynthesis as a precursor called chymotrypsinogen that is enzymatically inactive.

Chymotrypsin and Trypsin appear to have similar mechanisms of action. The chief difference between the two molecules seems to be in their specificity, that is, each is active only against the peptide bonds in protein molecules that have carboxyl groups donated by certain amino acids. For trypsin these amino acids are arginine and lysine. The main substrates of chymotrypsin include tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine, leucine and methionine.



(1) Reference.com website.
[Online: http://www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Enzyme]

(2) NutritionalCenter.com
[Online: http://www.nutritionalcenter.com/site/en/reference/nutrients/view/90]

(3) University of Maryland Medical Center. Medical Reference.
[Online: http://www.umm.edu/ency/article/003464.htm]

(4) Medical Dictionary. Medicine.net
[Online: http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5079]

(5) Enzyme Stuff website.
[Online: http://www.enzymestuff.com/basicswhichenzyme.htm]