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DHEA Tablets

SUGGESTED USE: 1 capsule per day or as recommended by your health care professional.

Formulated to be free of allergens derived from: Gluten, corn, yeast, artificial colors and flavors. Do not consume this product if you are pregnant or nursing. Consult your physician for further information. As with all dietary supplements, some individuals may not tolerate or may be allergic to the ingredients used. Please read the ingredient panel carefully prior to ingestion. Cease taking this product and consult your physician if you have negative reactions upon ingestion.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained on this web site has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. Material on the Imupharm web site is provided for educational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition, and before undertaking any diet, exercise or other health program.



DHEA is a natural steroid hormone precursor produced from cholesterol by the adrenal glands, the gonads, adipose tissue, brain and in the skin (by an autocrine mechanism). DHEA is the precursor of androstenedione, which can undergo further conversion to produce the androgen testosterone and the estrogens estrone and estradiol.

DHEA and Cancer:

DHEA is known to have anti-proliferative effect. In an investigation of the mechanism behind DHEA-induced growth arrest of hepatoma cells, it was accompanied by reduced expression of nucleus-encoded mitochondrial genes, morphological and functional alterations of mitochondria; and depletion of intracellular ATP. It is likely that DHEA suppresses cell growth by altering mitochondrial gene expression, morphology and functions (Reference 1).

Higher levels of endogenous sex steroid hormones are associated with increased risks of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

DHEA and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE):

Serum levels of DHEA are decreased in patients with inflammatory diseases including lupus, and these levels seem to correlate inversely with disease activity. Following encouraging studies demonstrating beneficial effects of DHEA supplementation in murine lupus models, several clinical studies have tested the effect of DHEA in lupus patients. DHEA treatment could improve overall quality-of-life assessment measures and glucocorticoid requirements in some lupus patients with mild to moderate disease (Reference 2).

DHEA and Adrenopause:

The reduced endogenous concentrations of DHEA and DHEAS found in advancing age have been correlated with a constellation of health problems. Because these steroids seem to play a role in the maintenance of immunity, musculoskeletal integrity, and cardiovascular health, age-associated declines in adrenal androgen production may lead to decreased immune function, osteoporosis, and atherosclerosis (Reference 3).



(1) Dehydroepiandrosterone induces growth arrest of hepatoma cells via alteration of mitochondrial gene expression and function. Ho HY, Cheng ML, Chiu HY, Weng SF, Chiu DT. Int J Oncol. 2008 Nov;33(5):969-77.
   
DHEA is known to have anti-proliferative effect. The mechanism is not completely understood. We investigated the mechanism underlying DHEA-induced growth arrest of hepatoma cells. Growth inhibition was associated with increased G6PD activity, and insensitive to reversal by mevalonate. Thus, DHEA does not act via inhibition of G6PD and HMGR. Instead, growth stagnation was accompanied by reduced expression of nucleus-encoded mitochondrial genes; morphological and functional alterations of mitochondria; and depletion of intracellular ATP. Conversely, pyruvate supplementation alleviated DHEA-induced growth inhibition. It is likely that DHEA suppresses cell growth by altering mitochondrial gene expression, morphology and functions.

(2) Dehydroepiandrosterone in systemic lupus erythematosus. Sawalha AH, Kovats S. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2008 Aug;10(4):286-91.
   
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a weak androgen that exerts pleomorphic effects on the immune system. The hormone has no known receptor, and consequently, its mechanism of action on immunocompetent cells remains poorly understood. Interestingly, serum levels of DHEA are decreased in patients with inflammatory diseases including lupus, and these levels seem to correlate inversely with disease activity. Following encouraging studies demonstrating beneficial effects of DHEA supplementation in murine lupus models, several clinical studies have tested the effect of DHEA in lupus patients. DHEA treatment could improve overall quality-of-life assessment measures and glucocorticoid requirements in some lupus patients with mild to moderate disease; however, DHEA's effect on disease activity in lupus patients remains controversial. Long-term safety studies are required in light of the reported effect of DHEA supplementation in lowering high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in lupus patients.

(3) [Adrenopause] [Article in Polish] Szkróbka W, Krysiak R, OkopieÅ„ B. Pol Merkur Lekarski. 2008 Jul;25(145):77-82.

The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in the aging people is characterised by an unexplained reduction of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) secretion while ACTH and cortisol production remains relatively unchanged. This decline in the biological activity of the zona reticularis, referred to as 'adrenopause', may contribute to the physiology of human aging. The reduced endogenous concentrations of DHEA and DHEAS found in advancing age have been correlated with a constellation of health problems. Because these steroids seem to play a role in the maintenance of immunity, musculoskeletal integrity, and cardiovascular health, age-associated declines in adrenal androgen production may lead to decreased immune function, osteoporosis, and atherosclerosis. Despite clear benefits of DHEA administration in patients with adrenal insufficiency, the results of DHEA supplementation in healthy euadrenal subjects are not so clear-cut. Studies assessing its action on sexual function, metabolism and cardiovascular functions have provided conflicting results. This paper summarises the present state of knowledge on the age-related changes in adrenal androgen production and discusses pros and cons of DHEA use in older people.